Does Bone Drug Treat Hair Loss?

Does Bone Drug Treat Hair Loss?


A drug intended as a treatment for osteoporosis may help treat hair loss, researchers say.

“The fact this new agent, which had never even been considered in a hair loss context, promotes human hair growth is exciting because of its translational potential: It could one day make a real difference to people who suffer from hair loss,” said study leader Nathan Hawkshaw, of the University of Manchester in England.

“Clearly though, a clinical trial is required next to tell us whether this drug or similar compounds are both effective and safe in hair loss patients,” Hawkshaw said in a university news release. > >> read more ...

FDA Approves First Drug for Inherited Kidney Disease

FDA Approves First Drug for Inherited Kidney Disease


The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the first drug to slow kidney decline in patients with the most common inherited kidney disease.

Jynarque (jihn-AR’-kew), from Japan’s Otsuka Pharmaceutical, was approved Tuesday for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

The progressive genetic disorder is the fourth-leading cause of kidney failure. It causes fluid-filled cysts to develop in and damage kidneys.

The FDA rejected it in 2013 but approved it after the drugmaker did an additional study. That one-year study, involving 1,370 patients with advanced disease, found the drug on average slowed kidney function decline about 35 percent more than dummy pills. > >> read more ...

Study Drug Gives Hope to Kids With Rapid Aging Disease

Study Drug Gives Hope to Kids With Rapid Aging Disease


Children with a rare, incurable disease that causes rapid aging and early death may live longer if treated with an experimental drug first developed for cancer patients, a study suggests.

The small, preliminary study isn’t proof the drug works and it found only a small benefit: Treated children with the disease progeria were more likely than others to survive during the two-year study. But some kids taking the drug in this and other studies have lived into their late teens. Researchers and others say the results suggest a potential breakthrough for a heartbreaking condition that typically kills kids before they reach adulthood. > >> read more ...

New Drug Could Treat Stubborn Migraines: Study

New Drug Could Treat Stubborn Migraines: Study


The millions of Americans who suffer from migraine may have a new source of hope — the first of a new class of drugs aimed at warding off the headaches.

Researchers found that the injected drug, called erenumab, could prevent migraines if other treatments fail to do so.

Erenumab (brand name Aimovig) works by blocking a key brain “neurotransmitter” chemical that sends out pain signals, the research team explained.

Working with a group of people with tough-to-treat migraine, the “study found that erenumab reduced the average number of monthly migraine headaches by more than 50 percent for nearly a third of study participants,” lead researcher Dr. Uwe Reuter, of The Charite University Medicine Berlin in Germany, said in a news release from the American Academy of Neurology (AAN). > >> read more ...

Marijuana-Based Drug Gets Positive Review From US Agency

Marijuana-Based Drug Gets Positive Review From US Agency


The FDA gave a marijuana-based drug a positive review Tuesday, when health officials said the closely watched medicine reduces seizures in children with severe forms of epilepsy and warrants approval in the United States.

British drugmaker GW Pharmaceuticals is seeking permission to sell its purified form of an ingredient found in cannabis — one that doesn’t get users high — as a medication for rare, hard-to-treat seizures in children. If successful, the company’s liquid formula would be the first government-approved drug derived from the cannabis plant in the U.S. > >> read more ...

Cannabis-Based Epilepsy Drug Gets Positive Review: FDA

Cannabis-Based Epilepsy Drug Gets Positive Review: FDA


GW Pharmaceuticals’ cannabis-derived medicine for severe childhood epilepsy won a favorable review from U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) staff on Tuesday, boosting hopes for its approval in the world’s biggest drugs market.

Shares in the company, which has operations in Britain and the United States, were 11 percent higher in early Nasdaq trade on the news.

GW’s medicine Epidiolex, which is given as a syrup, is a purified form of cannabidiol, one of the active ingredients found in marijuana. It contains less than 0.1 percent of tetrahydrocannabinol, the substance that makes people high. > >> read more ...

Organs From Drug Overdoses May Help Transplant Shortage

Organs From Drug Overdoses May Help Transplant Shortage


Fatal drug overdoses are increasing organ donations, and researchers reported Monday that people who receive those transplants generally fare as well as patients given organs from more traditional donors.

The findings could encourage more use of organs from overdose victims. Researchers from Johns Hopkins University found those transplants have jumped nearly 24-fold since 2000. That was before overdoses were making headlines or most transplant centers considered accepting such organs. > >> read more ...

New Autism Drug Being Tested

New Autism Drug Being Tested


A first-of-a-kind autism drug is being tested in a U.S.-wide clinical trial that includes 300 children and teens with high functioning autism.

Researchers are assessing if the drug, balovaptan, can help improve social behavior in youngsters with autism. Previous research found that the drug helped adults with autism, CBS News reported.

“There are not any approved treatments for what we think of as the core symptoms of autism all of the social difficulties, repetitive behaviors and the ability to function in everyday life,” said Dr. Eric Hollander, director, Autism and Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum Program, Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx. > >> read more ...

Gabapentin Painkiller That Gives Other Drugs a Kick Is New Drug Threat

Gabapentin Painkiller That Gives Other Drugs a Kick Is New Drug Threat


A new drug threat, gabapentin, a non-opioid painkiller used by some addicts to give their other drugs a boost, has become a cause for concern among health officials in several states.

The drug is touted as a non-addictive painkiller and is commonly prescribed for patients as an alternative to opioids for treating nerve pain and seizures.

However, emerging statistics link gabapentin to increased drug use, addiction and even fatal overdoses, which is why Kentucky has become the first state to classify the drug as a controlled substance, NBC News reported. > >> read more ...

Choosing the Right Drug for Springtime Sniffles

Choosing the Right Drug for Springtime Sniffles


Hay fever sufferers often choose the wrong medication for their seasonal sniffles, new research suggests.

With flowers, trees and grasses springing back to life, folks with allergies will start to complain of sneezing, runny noses, and watery, itchy eyes.

More often than not, though, they’ll head to the allergy aisle of their nearest drug store without advice from a doctor or pharmacist, the new study found.

Only 63 percent of people who visit their community pharmacy to purchase treatment for their hay fever have a doctor diagnosis, said study senior author Sinthia Bosnic-Anticevich. > >> read more ...

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