Exercise Helps Chronic Health Problems, Say Experts

Exercise Helps Chronic Health Problems, Say Experts


Exercise can help prevent many chronic illnesses as well as make it easier to manage health conditions, from diabetes to joint pain.

In terms of prevention, aim for the recommended 150 minutes of exercise, like brisk walking or cycling, each week. Along with eating a healthy diet, this can cut your risk of diabetes by more than a third, plus increase your level of good cholesterol. Exercise also lowers body weight, blood pressure and triglycerides, thus reducing key risk factors for heart disease. > >> read more ...

Can You Exercise Your Blues Away?

Can You Exercise Your Blues Away?


Regular exercise can reduce your risk of depression, no matter what your age or where you live, research suggests.

In a new study, an international team of researchers analyzed data from 49 studies that included nearly 267,000 people in North America, Europe and Oceania. The study participants did not have any mental illnesses and were followed for an average of more than seven years.

High levels of physical activity were associated with a lower risk of depression in all age groups during the follow-up, the investigators found. However, the new study was not designed to prove that exercise actually caused depression risk to drop. > >> read more ...

Staying Hydrated Helps Aging Brains Get More From Exercise

Staying Hydrated Helps Aging Brains Get More From Exercise


Older adults, drink up. You need plenty of water during exercise so your brain gets the full benefits of working out, researchers say.

“Middle-age and older adults often display a blunted thirst perception, which places them at risk for dehydration, and subsequently may reduce the cognitive [mental] health-related benefits of exercise,” said Brandon Yates, of Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital in Boston, and colleagues.

The researchers noted that previous studies have shown that dehydration reduces exercise performance and brain function in young people, but less is known about its impact on seniors. > >> read more ...

Exercise Halves Risk of Dying After Heart Attack: Researchers

Exercise Halves Risk of Dying After Heart Attack: Researchers


Exercising after a heart attack may help stave off death for longer, Swedish researchers said Thursday.

A study which followed 22,000 heart attack survivors aged 18-74, found that those who boosted their exercise levels after being discharged from hospital, halved their risk of dying within the first four years.

“It is well known that physically active people are less likely to have a heart attack and more likely to live longer,” said Orjan Ekblom of the Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences. > >> read more ...

Exercise, Not Vitamins, Prevents Falls in Seniors, Say Experts

Exercise, Not Vitamins, Prevents Falls in Seniors, Say Experts


Falling is the leading cause of injury-related death among people over age 65, and seniors who want to avoid falls should exercise, not rely on supplements like vitamin D, US guidelines said Tuesday.

The new recommendations from the US Preventive Services Task Force update those last issued in 2012, when the independent medical advisory group was favorable to taking supplements containing vitamin D as a way of preventing fall-related injury.

But unless a person has vitamin D deficiency or a frail bone condition known as osteoporosis, the task force’s latest review of clinical trials on the topic found no benefit for average seniors, and even an increased risk of kidney stones for those who take vitamin D and calcium supplements. > >> read more ...

Most People Prefer Pill Over Exercise or Injections to Control High Blood Pressure

Most People Prefer Pill Over Exercise or Injections to Control High Blood Pressure


A new US survey has revealed that if given the choice, most of us would choose popping a pill or drinking a daily cup of tea over exercise in order to lower high blood pressure.

Led by researchers from Yale School of Medicine, the team surveyed 1,384 US adults, most of whom had high blood pressure, to find out more about how people weigh up the benefits of treatments with the inconveniences.

The researchers asked participants to imagine that they had high blood pressure and then asked about how willing they would be to undergo any of four “treatments” to gain an extra month, year or five years of life.  > >> read more ...

Exercise Reduces Heart Risks Regardless of Genes

Exercise Reduces Heart Risks Regardless of Genes


Staying physically fit can help ward off heart trouble, even if your genetics put you at higher risk for clogged arteries, a new, large study suggests.

The researchers looked at nearly 500,000 middle-aged and older adults and found those with higher fitness levels were less likely to develop heart disease over six years. And that was true even for people who carried gene variants that raise the odds of heart problems.

That does not mean exercise erases the effects of genes, the researchers added. But if you do have a genetic vulnerability to heart disease, you’re better off being physically fit. > >> read more ...

Does Exercise Make You Happy?

Does Exercise Make You Happy?


New US research suggests that if you want to be happier, try exercising, with a review of studies from around the world finding that physical activity can boost levels of contentment in all ages.

Although many previous studies have found that physical activity can be beneficial for mental health conditions such as depression and anxiety, working as both prevention and treatment, less is known about how it can affect positive mental health conditions, such as contentment.

To research further, Weiyun Chen and co-author Zhanjia Zhang, both at the University of Michigan, reviewed 23 studies on happiness and physical activity. > >> read more ...

Tai Chi May Be Best Exercise for Fibromyalgia Patients: Study

Tai Chi May Be Best Exercise for Fibromyalgia Patients: Study


A study published by the British Medical Journal suggests that tai chi may be as good — or better — than aerobic exercise for people who suffer from fibromyalgia, a pathology linked to chronic fatigue, sleep disturbance and muscle pain that mainly affects women. 

What type of exercise should be recommended for fibromyalgia sufferers who account for two to four percent of the world’s population?

Generally treated at pain centers where the condition is diagnosed, these patients, who are mainly women, are encouraged to exercise regularly to alleviate widespread pain and anxiety and to boost their general health. > >> read more ...

All Exercise Reduces Death Risk

All Exercise Reduces Death Risk


What’s the best exercise to fight the effects of a sedentary life and live a long life? For decades Americans have been getting conflicting information, but a new study finds that all types of exercise, whether done in defined exercise periods or in short bursts throughout the day, are all effective in reducing the risk of disease and death.

“For about 30 years, guidelines have suggested that moderate-to-vigorous activity could provide health benefits, but only if you sustained the activity for 10 minutes or more,” said study author Dr. William E. Kraus of the Duke University School of Medicine. > >> read more ...

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