Hearing Aids Linked to Less Hospitalization: Study

Hearing Aids Linked to Less Hospitalization: Study


Older adults with hearing loss are less likely to be hospitalized or to visit the emergency room when they wear hearing aids, compared to those who don’t, a U.S. study suggests.
Researchers examined Medicare payment data collected in 2013 and 2014 for 1,336 adults 65 and older with hearing loss. Overall, 734 people, or 55 percent, didn’t wear hearing aids.

During the study period, 24 percent of people with hearing aids and 26 percent of those without the devices visited an emergency room at least once, the study found. With hearing aids, 20 percent of people were hospitalized, compared to 22 percent without the devices. > >> read more ...

Genes Linked to Sunburn, Skin Cancer Risk

Genes Linked to Sunburn, Skin Cancer Risk


Certain genes can determine which people are more at risk of getting sunburnt, and possibly develop skin cancer as a result, scientists said Tuesday.

In a trawl of the genetics of nearly 180,000 people of European ancestry in Britain, Australia, the Netherlands and United States, researchers found 20 sunburn genes.

Eight of the genes had been associated with skin cancer in previous research, according to findings published in the journal Nature Communications.

And in at least one region of the genome, “we have found evidence to suggest that the gene involved in melanoma risk… acts through increasing susceptibility to sunburns,” co-author Mario Falchi of King’s College London told AFP. > >> read more ...

Even Mild Concussions Linked to Dementia Risk: Study

Even Mild Concussions Linked to Dementia Risk: Study


Concussions, even those that are mild, more than double the risk for developing dementia down the road, new research suggests.

The findings stem from an analysis that tracked concussions and dementia risk among nearly 360,000 military veterans.

Study author Deborah Barnes noted that many of the younger vets in the study had experienced concussions while in combat, often in Iraq and Afghanistan. Head blows among older vets were often due to falls or car accidents.

“Results were similar in the two groups,” she said, “so we don’t think there is anything special about these head injuries.” That makes it more likely that the dementia risk seen among military personnel would also apply to the general population. > >> read more ...

Gene Linked to Migraines May Have Helped Humans Adapt to Cold

Gene Linked to Migraines May Have Helped Humans Adapt to Cold


A common gene variant linked to migraine headaches may have proliferated because it made it easier for early humans adapt to cold weather in northern climates, a new study suggests.
Migraines have long been more common in people of European descent than those from Africa, and both genetics and environment are thought to play a role. For the current study, researchers focused on TRPM8, a gene involved in regulating the ability to detect cold that’s also associated with vulnerability to migraines. > >> read more ...

Daily Aspirin Linked to Deadly Skin Cancer in Men: Study

Daily Aspirin Linked to Deadly Skin Cancer in Men: Study


New US research has found a link between taking a daily aspirin and a higher risk of melanoma in men, the most dangerous form of skin cancer.

Carried out by researchers at Northwestern University, the study looked at medical records from 195,140 patients aged 18-89, who had no prior history of melanoma.

From this base, 1,187 of the patients were aspirin exposed, with the researchers only including patients who had been taking aspirin daily for at least one year at a dose of 81 or 325 mg. > >> read more ...

Anxiety in Mid-Life Linked to Dementia Later: Study

Anxiety in Mid-Life Linked to Dementia Later: Study


People with moderate to severe anxiety in middle age may be more likely to develop dementia as they get older, a recent study suggests.
Researchers examined data from four previously published studies that tracked a total of almost 30,000 people for at least a decade. In each of the smaller studies, there was a clear connection between anxiety in midlife and dementia later on, researchers report in BMJ Open.

“If people are living with moderate to severe anxiety we would encourage them to seek help,” said senior study author Natalie Marchant of University College London in the UK. > >> read more ...

E. Coli Outbreak Linked to Romaine Lettuce Grows to 84 Cases

E. Coli Outbreak Linked to Romaine Lettuce Grows to 84 Cases


The romaine lettuce E. coli outbreak has grown and sickened 84 people from 19 states, the Centers for Disease Control said, adding that at least another 31 cases are believed to be tied to the crop grown in Yuma, Arizona.

Those infected range in age from 1 to 88 and more than half of are female. Forty-two people have been hospitalized, including nine battling kidney failure. Symptoms of E. coli infection include diarrhea, severe stomach cramps and vomiting, the agency said. > >> read more ...

Study Says Artificial Sweeteners May Be Linked With Diabetes, Obesity

Study Says Artificial Sweeteners May Be Linked With Diabetes, Obesity


Diabetes and obesity could be linked to artificial sweeteners, a new study has found.

Researchers from the Medical College of Wisconsin and Marquette University believe that zero-calorie sweeteners could change the way the body metabolizes fat and gets its energy, Newsweek reported.

They also found that acesulfame potassium, a component commonly found in artificial sweeteners, accumulated in the blood and posed a harmful effect on the cells that line blood vessels.

Experts have blamed the over consumption of sugar as the main culprit behind the obesity and type 2 diabetes epidemic in the U.S., The Guardian reported. > >> read more ...

Feminine Hygiene Products Linked to Infections: Study

Feminine Hygiene Products Linked to Infections: Study


New Canadian research has raised concerns over vaginal hygiene products, suggesting that they could actually do more harm than good for women’s health.

Carried out by researchers at the University of Guelph, Ontario, the study surveyed 1,435 Canadian women about their vaginal health habits, products they used, and how often they experienced any health problems.

More than 95 percent of the women reported using at least one product in or around the vaginal area, with the most commonly used products including anti-itch creams, moisturizers and lubricants, and feminine wipes. > >> read more ...

Low Testosterone Linked to Chronic Disease: Study

Low Testosterone Linked to Chronic Disease: Study


New US research has found that a lower level of testosterone could have a negative effect on a man’s risk of developing chronic disease.

Previous research has already linked low levels of testosterone to sexual health and muscle mass. However, the new study, carried out by researchers from Michigan Medicine at the University of Michigan, set out to look at whether there was also an association between testosterone, age and chronic disease.

“If we look at data for men from a population level, it has become evident over time that chronic disease is on the rise in older males,” explained lead author of the study Mark Peterson. “But we’re also finding that a consequence of being obese and physically inactive is that men are seeing declines in testosterone even at younger ages.” > >> read more ...

error: Content is protected !!