Lung Cancer Risk Factors Include More Than Smoking

Lung Cancer Risk Factors Include More Than Smoking


New European research has revealed some of the key risk factors for lung cancer, finding that it is not only heavy smokers who have more chance of developing the disease.

Carried out by researchers from the University of Crete, Greece and the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway, together the team looked at survey responses from 65,000 Norwegians aged between 20 and 100 to identify the strongest risk factors.

From their sample, the researchers found that 94 percent of the patients diagnosed with lung cancer were smokers or ex-smokers.  > >> read more ...

Study: Immune Therapy Scores Big Win Against Lung Cancer

Study: Immune Therapy Scores Big Win Against Lung Cancer


For the first time, a treatment that boosts the immune system greatly improved survival in people newly diagnosed with the most common form of lung cancer. It’s the biggest win so far for immunotherapy, which has had much of its success until now in less common cancers.

In the study, Merck’s Keytruda, given with standard chemotherapy, cut in half the risk of dying or having the cancer worsen, compared to chemo alone after nearly one year. The results are expected to quickly set a new standard of care for about 70,000 patients each year in the United States whose lung cancer has already spread by the time it’s found. > >> read more ...

Poor Air Quality Tied to Spike in Heart, Lung Problems but Patients Unaware

Poor Air Quality Tied to Spike in Heart, Lung Problems but Patients Unaware


Poor air quality with high levels of tiny pollution particles known as PM 2.5 are tied to a spike in emergency department visits for heart- and lung-related illnesses and stroke, a California study suggests, but a nationwide U.S. survey finds that few heart patients are aware of air quality risks.

Based on analysis of areas affected by the intense 2015 California wildfire season, researchers found that within a day of residents being exposed to dense smoke, emergency room visits for heart attacks and other cardiac events and symptoms rose by 15 percent overall, and 42 percent among people over age 65. > >> read more ...

Immune Therapy Boosts Lung Cancer Survival Rates, Study Finds

Immune Therapy Boosts Lung Cancer Survival Rates, Study Finds


Immune therapy improved lung cancer survival rates in a new study of those recently diagnosed with the disease in the biggest win so far for the treatment, which has had much of its success until now in less common cancers.

In the study, Merck’s Keytruda, given with standard chemotherapy, cut in half the risk of dying or having the cancer worsen, compared to chemo alone after nearly one year, according to The Associated Press. The results are expected to quickly set a new standard of care for about 70,000 patients each year in the United States whose lung cancer has already spread by the time it’s found. > >> read more ...

Immune Therapy Scores Big Win Against Lung Cancer in Study

Immune Therapy Scores Big Win Against Lung Cancer in Study


For the first time, a treatment that boosts the immune system greatly improved survival in people newly diagnosed with the most common form of lung cancer. It’s the biggest win so far for immunotherapy, which has had much of its success until now in less common cancers.

In the study, Merck’s Keytruda, given with standard chemotherapy, cut in half the risk of dying or having the cancer worsen, compared to chemo alone after nearly one year. The results are expected to quickly set a new standard of care for about 70,000 patients each year in the United States whose lung cancer has already spread by the time it’s found. > >> read more ...

Keytruda Helps Lung Cancer Patients Live Longer: Study

Keytruda Helps Lung Cancer Patients Live Longer: Study


Merck & Co’s blockbuster drug Keytruda helped previously untreated lung cancer patients live longer in a late-stage trial, potentially cementing its position as the dominant player in the lucrative lung cancer market.Shares of the drugmaker were up 3.1 percent at $55.07.

Merck is already considered the frontrunner in the space and Keytruda is expected to earn peak sales of over $10 billion in 2023, according to Credit Suisse.

Keytruda is already approved in the U.S. to treat patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have not received prior therapies and whose tumors show PD-L1 protein levels of 50 percent or greater. > >> read more ...

Immunotherapy Cocktail Boosts Lung Cancer Survival

Immunotherapy Cocktail Boosts Lung Cancer Survival


Roche’s Tecentriq immunotherapy combined with other drugs boosted lung cancer patients’ survival versus an older cocktail, the Swiss company said as it seeks an edge on Merck and Bristol-Myers Squibb.

Mixing Tecentriq with Avastin and carboplatin and paclitaxel boosted overall survival in first-line treatment of non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer, Roche said on Monday, compared to patients who received only Avastin plus the two chemotherapies.

The latest trial success follows Roche’s announcement last week about a separate study in which Tecentriq mixed with chemotherapies carboplatin and Abraxane boosted progression-free survival, compared with chemotherapy alone, in first-line treatment of patients with advanced squamous non-small cell lung cancer. > >> read more ...

Thirdhand Smoke Increases Lung Cancer Risk: Study

Thirdhand Smoke Increases Lung Cancer Risk: Study


Thirdhand smoke increases the risk of lung cancer — at least in mice. Researchers at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) identified thirdhand smoke, which is the poisonous residue that linger on surfaces long after a cigarette has been extinguished, as a health hazard 10 years ago.

In 2017, the researchers reported that brief exposure to thirdhand smoke was associated with low body weight and immune changes in juvenile mice. > >> read more ...

Mom’s Smoking During Pregnancy Reduces Baby’s Lung Capacity: Study

Mom’s Smoking During Pregnancy Reduces Baby’s Lung Capacity: Study


New US research has found that smoking while pregnant could be even worse for children with asthma than exposing them to secondhand smoke in childhood. 

Carried out by researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, the team looked at 2,070 children aged six to 11 years to assess the relationship between lung function and type of secondhand smoke exposure.

The researchers asked parents to self-report on their children’s exposure to tobacco smoke during pregnancy and measured the children’s current tobacco smoke exposure using the levels of cotinine in the blood. Cotinine is a major metabolite of nicotine and a strong biomarker of exposure to tobacco smoke. > >> read more ...

Immunotherapy Drug OK’d for Lung Cancer: FDA

Immunotherapy Drug OK’d for Lung Cancer: FDA


AstraZeneca’s immunotherapy drug Imfinzi has won crucial approval from U.S. regulators for use in lung cancer, opening up a multibillion-dollar market for a medicine that has so far lagged behind competitors.
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) said late on Friday it had granted approval for expanded use of Imfinzi to treat non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with inoperable mid-stage disease that has not spread widely around the body.

Imfinzi is the first immunotherapy to be approved in this setting and the company’s shares rose 1 percent in early trade on Monday. > >> read more ...

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