Duped Patients Crowdfund for Bogus Medical Care: Study

Duped Patients Crowdfund for Bogus Medical Care: Study


They’re the tech-age version of donor jars at the diner: crowdfunding websites that aim to link ailing people with strangers willing to help pay for medical treatment. But new research suggests duped patients sometimes crowdfund to pay for bogus stem cell treatments.

A study published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association focused on for-profit clinics that use direct-to-consumer advertising for costly unproven stem-cell treatments for conditions including chronic lung disease, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis and arthritis. Treatments are often marketed as cures or with a promise for vastly improved health. > >> read more ...

Music May Calm Alzheimer’s Patients: Study

Music May Calm Alzheimer’s Patients: Study


Music therapy might help ease the anxiety and agitation that plagues many Alzheimer’s patients, researchers suggest.

“People with dementia are confronted by a world that is unfamiliar to them, which causes disorientation and anxiety,” said study co-author Dr. Jeff Anderson, an associate professor of radiology at the University of Utah Health.

“We believe music will tap into the salience network of the brain that is still relatively functioning,” he added in a university news release. > >> read more ...

Poor Air Quality Tied to Spike in Heart, Lung Problems but Patients Unaware

Poor Air Quality Tied to Spike in Heart, Lung Problems but Patients Unaware


Poor air quality with high levels of tiny pollution particles known as PM 2.5 are tied to a spike in emergency department visits for heart- and lung-related illnesses and stroke, a California study suggests, but a nationwide U.S. survey finds that few heart patients are aware of air quality risks.

Based on analysis of areas affected by the intense 2015 California wildfire season, researchers found that within a day of residents being exposed to dense smoke, emergency room visits for heart attacks and other cardiac events and symptoms rose by 15 percent overall, and 42 percent among people over age 65. > >> read more ...

Patients More Satisfied With Docs Who See Fewer People: Study

Patients More Satisfied With Docs Who See Fewer People: Study


Doctors who see fewer patients may get better online reviews than physicians who have higher-volume practices, a study of U.S. urologists suggests.

Researchers examined data on 665 urologists with Medicare patients in California, looking at how many patients they treated as well as what types of reviews they got on four websites: Yelp.com, Vitals.com, Healthgrades.com and Ratemd.com.

Half of the urologists treated at least 426 patients covered by Medicare in 2014. Overall, the physicians who treated fewer patients got higher satisfaction ratings online, the study found. > >> read more ...

Keytruda Helps Lung Cancer Patients Live Longer: Study

Keytruda Helps Lung Cancer Patients Live Longer: Study


Merck & Co’s blockbuster drug Keytruda helped previously untreated lung cancer patients live longer in a late-stage trial, potentially cementing its position as the dominant player in the lucrative lung cancer market.Shares of the drugmaker were up 3.1 percent at $55.07.

Merck is already considered the frontrunner in the space and Keytruda is expected to earn peak sales of over $10 billion in 2023, according to Credit Suisse.

Keytruda is already approved in the U.S. to treat patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have not received prior therapies and whose tumors show PD-L1 protein levels of 50 percent or greater. > >> read more ...

Denver Hospital Patients Possibly Exposed to HIV, Hepatitis

Denver Hospital Patients Possibly Exposed to HIV, Hepatitis


Surgery patients at a Denver hospital may have been exposed to HIV or hepatitis as a result of contaminated surgical instruments, hospital and state health officials said.

An infection-control breach at Porter Adventist Hospital may have put some surgery patients at risk for contracting hepatitis B, hepatitis C or HIV,  the Denver Post reports.

The breach may have affected patients who had orthopedic or spine surgery between July 21, 2016, and Feb. 20. The risk of infection is “very low,” said Larry Wolk, the executive director and chief medical officer for the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, > >> read more ...

Cancer Vaccine to Be Tested in Lymphoma Patients

Cancer Vaccine to Be Tested in Lymphoma Patients


Stanford Univesity researchers are recruiting lymphoma patients to test a new cancer vaccine that had a 97 percent success rate in “curing” mice with cancer.

The clinical trial will involve about 15 patients with low-grade lymphoma and begin by the end of the year, according to a Stanford news release.

Lead research Dr. Ronald Levy, director of the lymphoma program at the Stanford Cancer Institute in California, said he believes the treatment could be useful for many tumor types. > >> read more ...

Deaths of 5 Patients Taking Hemlibra Drop Roche Stock

Deaths of 5 Patients Taking Hemlibra Drop Roche Stock


News of five Hemlibra deaths dropped the stock of Swiss drugmaker Roche on Wednesday after the company told U.S.-based haemophilia advocacy groups that some patients treated with its medicine had died, while maintaining that the therapy was not the cause of the deaths.

The Hemophilia Federation of America and the National Hemophilia Foundation groups issued alerts on Tuesday after Roche’s Genentech unit informed them of the deaths of patients with the genetic disease that stops blood from clotting properly. > >> read more ...

Do Patients Have a ‘Right to Try’ Unapproved Drugs?

Do Patients Have a ‘Right to Try’ Unapproved Drugs?


The idea is a political crowd-pleaser with a catchy slogan: giving desperately ill patients the “right to try” experimental medicines.

Lawmakers in the U.S. House of Representatives on Wednesday became the latest group of politicians to back the effort, sending a bill to the Senate which President Donald Trump has pledged to sign into law.

A federal right-to-try law — first championed by anti-regulatory libertarians — would overturn decades of precedent in which the government served as the gatekeeper to unproven medicines. And critics fear it could rollback long-standing safety regulations that protect patients. > >> read more ...

Tai Chi May Be Best Exercise for Fibromyalgia Patients: Study

Tai Chi May Be Best Exercise for Fibromyalgia Patients: Study


A study published by the British Medical Journal suggests that tai chi may be as good — or better — than aerobic exercise for people who suffer from fibromyalgia, a pathology linked to chronic fatigue, sleep disturbance and muscle pain that mainly affects women. 

What type of exercise should be recommended for fibromyalgia sufferers who account for two to four percent of the world’s population?

Generally treated at pain centers where the condition is diagnosed, these patients, who are mainly women, are encouraged to exercise regularly to alleviate widespread pain and anxiety and to boost their general health. > >> read more ...

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