Being Annoyed About Noise Pollution Increases Heart Risks

Being Annoyed About Noise Pollution Increases Heart Risks


New European research has found that exposure to annoying levels of noise could increase the risk of atrial fibrillation, a heart rhythm irregularity also known as heart flutter which can lead to stroke, heart failure, and other serious health conditions.

Carried out by researchers from the Department of Cardiology at the Mainz University Medical Center, Germany, the team looked at data taken from the Gutenberg Health Study (GHS), one of the largest studies of its kind which has already looked at the effects of noise pollution on health. > >> read more ...

Study: Face Masks May Be Ineffective Against Air Pollution

Study: Face Masks May Be Ineffective Against Air Pollution


Face masks available to consumers in China for protection against air pollution vary widely in their real-world performance, suggests a recent study.

Although a mask may filter tiny particles as advertised, face size and shape as well as movement can lead to leakage as high as 68 percent, researchers report in Occupational & Environmental Medicine.

“Even if the filtration efficiency of the mask is high, and the mask fits the person initially, the mask may not continue to give a good fit as the person goes about their daily activities — walking, talking, and more,” said senior study author Miranda Loh, an exposure and environmental scientist at the Institute of Occupational Medicine in Edinburgh, Scotland. > >> read more ...

More Evidence Links Air Pollution to Childhood Asthma

More Evidence Links Air Pollution to Childhood Asthma


New US research has found yet more evidence to suggest that there is a strong link between traffic pollution and asthma in young children. 

Led by scientists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, the study analyzed data from 1,522 children to assess the effect of long-term exposure to air pollution on asthma.

The children’s mothers were already enrolled in a long-term study called Project Viva, which gave the researchers access to comprehensive medical, socio-economic and demographic information, including their residential address history. > >> read more ...

Air Pollution Tied to IVF Failure

Air Pollution Tied to IVF Failure


Women exposed to high levels of air pollution may have less success getting pregnant with fertility treatments or staying pregnant, compared to women breathing cleaner air, a South Korean study suggests.
Researchers analyzed pregnancy rates over nine years and more than 6,600 IVF cycles at a Seoul fertility clinic and found reduced conception rates and increased pregnancy losses among women exposed to the highest levels of five types of air pollution.

“Although the specific mechanism is unclear, high ambient air pollution has been suggested to affect processes of conception assisted by in vitro fertilization (IVF), which means the impact of air pollution can be profound in couples who are suffering from infertility,” said lead author Dr. Seung-Ah Choe of the School of Medicine at CHA University and the CHA fertility clinic in Seoul. > >> read more ...

California Has Worst Air Pollution in US

California Has Worst Air Pollution in US


California has the most polluted cities in the United States, a report issued on Wednesday said, as President Donald Trump’s administration seeks to force the state to weaken its vehicle emissions standards.

The study published by the American Lung Association — which covers the period from 2014 to 2016, the year before Trump took office — said Los Angeles remained the city with the worst ozone pollution, and ranked fourth in terms of year-round particle contamination. > >> read more ...

Pollution Could Be Eased by Plastic-Eating Enzyme

Pollution Could Be Eased by Plastic-Eating Enzyme


A plastic-eating enzyme discovered by accident could help ease one of the world’s worst pollution problems once it can be applied on an industrial scale.

Researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Britain’s University of Portsmouth made the discovery while studying a microbe that could degrade plastic bottles, CNN reported.

They said an enzyme which showed up at a Japanese recycling plant could digest polyethylene terephthalate, PET, which was patented as a plastic in the 1940s and appears in millions of tons of plastic waste entering the ocean each year. > >> read more ...

Lifelong Air Pollution Raises Alzheimer’s Risk: Study

Lifelong Air Pollution Raises Alzheimer’s Risk: Study


New US research has found that growing up in a city with a high level of air pollution could increase the risk of Alzheimer’s disease and progression of the disease.

Carried out by researchers at the University of Montana, the study looked at the effects of air pollution in Mexico City, where 24 million people in the metropolitan area are exposed daily to concentrations of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and ozone pollution above US Environmental Protection Agency standards. > >> read more ...

Drop in Air Pollution Increases Swedish Life Expectancy

Drop in Air Pollution Increases Swedish Life Expectancy


New research has found that those living in the Swedish cities of Stockholm, Gothenburg and Malmö live on average one year longer today than 25 years ago thanks to a decrease in the level of traffic pollution.

Carried out by researchers at the Department of Environmental Sciences and Analytical Chemistry (ACES), the team looked at results from measurement stations located in the center of each city which tracked the levels of nitrogen oxides, ozone and particles in the air from 1990 to 2015.  > >> read more ...

Does Pollution Harm Blacks More Than Whites?

Does Pollution Harm Blacks More Than Whites?


Air pollution takes a greater toll on the hearts of black Americans than whites, in part because they often live in poorer areas with more pollution, a new study suggests.

“The greater risk of death from heart disease among blacks, compared with whites, is partially explained by higher exposure to air pollution,” said lead researcher Dr. Sebhat Erqou, a fellow in cardiovascular disease at the University of Pittsburgh.

The western Pennsylvania study looked at the relationship between heart disease and a component of air pollution known as fine particulate matter. Fine particulate matter (called PM2.5, which is about 40 times smaller than the width of a human hair) stems from factories, vehicles, power plants, fires and secondhand smoke. > >> read more ...

Exposure to Air Pollution During Pregnancy Alters Baby’s Brain: Study

Exposure to Air Pollution During Pregnancy Alters Baby’s Brain: Study


Babies exposed to air pollution while in the womb may have brain abnormalities that contribute to cognitive problems when they become school-aged, even if the levels of pollution are considered safe.

A study, which was published in Biological Psychiatry, showed for the first time that pollution interfered with inhibitory control — the ability of a person to regulate impulsive behavior and their actions when faced with temptations. This ability is related to mental health problems such as addictive behavior and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. > >> read more ...

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