PTSD May Raise Risk for Irregular Heartbeat, Says Research

PTSD May Raise Risk for Irregular Heartbeat, Says Research


For reasons that aren’t yet clear, people who battle PTSD may also be at heightened risk for the common heart rhythm disorder atrial fibrillation, researchers report.

It’s the first time a connection has been made between post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and “A-fib,” which typically arises with age and is the most common type of heart rhythm problem. A-fib can raise a person’s odds for a stroke, and has previously been linked with high blood pressure, diabetes, obesity and sleep apnea. > >> read more ...

Young Male Smokers Have Increased Stroke Risk

Young Male Smokers Have Increased Stroke Risk


Young men who smoke are more likely to have a stroke before age 50 than their peers who avoid tobacco, a small study suggests.
Smoking has long been linked to an increased risk of stroke in older adults, but research to date examining this connection in younger adults has mainly focused on women. For the current study, researchers examined data on 615 men who had a stroke before age 50 and compared their smoking habits to a control group of 530 similar men who didn’t have a history of stroke. > >> read more ...

Genes Linked to Sunburn, Skin Cancer Risk

Genes Linked to Sunburn, Skin Cancer Risk


Certain genes can determine which people are more at risk of getting sunburnt, and possibly develop skin cancer as a result, scientists said Tuesday.

In a trawl of the genetics of nearly 180,000 people of European ancestry in Britain, Australia, the Netherlands and United States, researchers found 20 sunburn genes.

Eight of the genes had been associated with skin cancer in previous research, according to findings published in the journal Nature Communications.

And in at least one region of the genome, “we have found evidence to suggest that the gene involved in melanoma risk… acts through increasing susceptibility to sunburns,” co-author Mario Falchi of King’s College London told AFP. > >> read more ...

Even Mild Concussions Linked to Dementia Risk: Study

Even Mild Concussions Linked to Dementia Risk: Study


Concussions, even those that are mild, more than double the risk for developing dementia down the road, new research suggests.

The findings stem from an analysis that tracked concussions and dementia risk among nearly 360,000 military veterans.

Study author Deborah Barnes noted that many of the younger vets in the study had experienced concussions while in combat, often in Iraq and Afghanistan. Head blows among older vets were often due to falls or car accidents.

“Results were similar in the two groups,” she said, “so we don’t think there is anything special about these head injuries.” That makes it more likely that the dementia risk seen among military personnel would also apply to the general population. > >> read more ...

Eggs Don’t Increase Heart Risk in Diabetics

Eggs Don’t Increase Heart Risk in Diabetics


People who are prediabetic or diabetic can eat up to 12 eggs a week and not increase their risk of cardiovascular disease, says a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Researchers at the University of Sydney sought to clear up conflicting dietary advice about eating eggs — does it or doesn’t it increase cardiovascular disease? They discovered that at the end of three months, six months, and 12 months, there was no difference in cardiovascular risk markers between people who ate a low-egg diet (less than two eggs a week) and those who ate a high-egg diet (12 eggs a week), even for those who were diagnosed with diabetes or pre-diabetes. > >> read more ...

Lung Cancer Risk Factors Include More Than Smoking

Lung Cancer Risk Factors Include More Than Smoking


New European research has revealed some of the key risk factors for lung cancer, finding that it is not only heavy smokers who have more chance of developing the disease.

Carried out by researchers from the University of Crete, Greece and the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway, together the team looked at survey responses from 65,000 Norwegians aged between 20 and 100 to identify the strongest risk factors.

From their sample, the researchers found that 94 percent of the patients diagnosed with lung cancer were smokers or ex-smokers.  > >> read more ...

Using Saunas Frequently May Cut Stroke Risk: Study

Using Saunas Frequently May Cut Stroke Risk: Study


People in Finland who regularly take saunas may face a far lower stroke risk than those who go less often, said a study Wednesday.

The report in the journal Neurology is the first to assess the relationship between saunas and strokes, and was based on more than 1,600 people who were followed for an average of 15 years.

Those who spent time in the sauna four to seven days a week showed a 61 percent lower risk of having a stroke than people who went just once a week, it said. > >> read more ...

Blood Type May Affect Death Risk After Trauma: Study

Blood Type May Affect Death Risk After Trauma: Study


People with the most common blood type, type O, may be at higher risk of death after suffering severe injuries because they’re more likely to have major bleeding, a new study suggests.

While the study is preliminary, Japanese researcher Dr. Wataru Takayama said the “results also raise questions about how emergency transfusion of O type red blood cells to a severe trauma patient could affect homeostasis, the process which causes bleeding to stop, and if this is different from other blood types.” > >> read more ...

Improved Diets Lower Risk of Liver Disease: Study

Improved Diets Lower Risk of Liver Disease: Study


People who make an effort to improve their diet may be more likely to have less fat in their livers and a lower risk of liver disease than individuals who stick to unhealthy eating habits, a U.S. study suggests.
Researchers focused on what’s known as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFDL), which is usually associated with obesity and certain eating habits. While dietary changes are recommended to treat this type of liver disease, research to date hasn’t clearly demonstrated whether these changes can work for prevention. > >> read more ...

Fatigue a Safety Risk in Ridesharing Companies: Study

Fatigue a Safety Risk in Ridesharing Companies: Study


Fatigue and sleepiness are inherent safety risks in the ridesharing industry today, the American Academy of Sleep Medicine warns.
In a new position paper, the AASM calls on ridesharing companies, government officials, medical professionals and law enforcement officers to address drivers’ fatigue as a public safety risk.

“Fatigued driving is common . . . and this is a real opportunity to work together to address this real safety risk,” said Dr. Indira Gurubhagavatula of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, who coauthor the group’s statement. > >> read more ...

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